1947 – – birth of the Roswell “alien saucer crash” myth that eventually helped promote the UFO Industry

‘FLYING DISC’  DIDN’T TURN OUT TO BE  – – RANCHER SORRY HE SAID ANYTHING ABOUT  ‘DISC FIND’

HERE IS THE DESCRIPTION OF WHAT THE RANCHER ACTUALLY SAW:

Associated Press newswire – – July 9, 1947 – – also from THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD:

(QUOTE)

W. W. (“Mac”) Brazel, 48, Lincoln county rancher living 30 miles south of Corona, today told his story of finding what the army at first described as a flying disk, but the publicity which attended his find caused him to add that if he ever found anything else short of a bomb, he sure wasn’t going to say anything about it.

Brazel was brought here late yesterday by W. E. Whitmore, of radio station KGFL, had his picture taken and gave an interview to the Record and Jason Kellahin, sent here from the Albuquerque bureau of the Associated Press to cover the story. The picture he posed for was sent out over AP telephoto wire sending machine specially set up in the Record office by R. D. Adair, AP wire chief sent here from Albuquerque for the sole purpose of getting out his picture and that of sheriff George Wilcox, to whom Brazel originally gave the information of his find.

Brazel related that on June 14  (10 days before the world had ever heard of “flying saucers” or “flying disks”)  he and an 8-year old son, Vernon, were about 7 or 8 miles from the ranch house of the J. B. Foster ranch, which he operates, when they came upon a large area of bright wreckage made up of rubber strips, tinfoil, a rather tough paper and sticks.

At the time Brazel was in a hurry to get his round made and he did not pay much attention to it.

But he did remark about what he had seen and on July 4 (Friday) he, his wife, Vernon and a daughter, Betty, age 14, went back to the spot and gathered up quite a bit of the debris.
The next day (Saturday, July 5) he first heard about the flying disks, and he wondered if what he had found might be the remnants of one of these.

Monday (July 7) he came to town to sell some wool and while here he went to see sheriff George Wilcox and “whispered kinda confidential like” that he might have found a flying disk.
Wilcox got in touch with the Roswell Army Air Field and Maj. Jesse A. Marcel (pictured below) and a man in plain clothes accompanied him home, where they picked up the rest of the pieces of the “disk” and went to his home to try to reconstruct it.

(Marcel’s commander, Colonel William Blanchard (pictured below) ordered Marcel and counterintelligence officer Sheridan Cavitt out to Brazel’s ranch.

On viewing the wreckage, Cavitt immediately thought it probably came from a weather balloon, but Marcel had other ideas.  Marcel had a pre-conceived notion that it must have been part of the flying disk that he had heard about.

When they arrived back, Marcel woke his wife and son, Jesse Jr., who even today remembers his father talking about flying saucers.

On July 8 (Tuesday) the public information office at the base made the announcement that they had recovered a flying disk (approved by Col. Blanchard).  This created newspaper headlines – – it was a sensation!:

However, at the intervention of Brigadier General Roger Ramey, who had also inspected the wreckage, a press conference was soon held that included Marcel.  The army announced that the fuss was over nothing more than a weather balloon, pieces of which were duly paraded for public display.

(Above – – July 9, ROSWELL DAILY RECORD newspaper headline)

Marcel didn’t agree with this conclusion, probably because this was unlike any weather balloon he had ever seen.

Prior to the press conference, a weather officer by the name of Irving Newton remembered seeing pieces of what he recognized as a weather balloon laid out in Ramey’s office.

(Irving Newton, pictured above)

In 1990s, Newton told investigators:

“I remember Major Marcel chased me all around that room…..He kept saying things like ‘Look how tough that metal is….look at the strange markings on it’….While I was examining the debris, Marcel was picking up pieces of the radar target sticks and trying to convince me that some notations on the sticks were alien writings.  But I was adamant that it was a weather balloon with a RAWIN (radar) target.  I think he was embarrassed as crazy and he would like to do anything to make that turn into a flying saucer” – – from Mysteries, Myths, Mayhem and Money chapter of Gary Bates’ ALIEN INTRUSION)

Brazel said that he did not see it fall from the sky and did not see it before it was torn up, so he did not know the size or shape it might have been, but he thought it might have been about as large as a table top. The balloon which held it up, if that was how it worked, must have been about 12 feet long, he felt, measuring the distance by the size of the room in which he sat. The rubber was smoky gray in color and scattered over an area about 200 yards in diameter.

When the debris was gathered up the tinfoil, paper, tape, and sticks made a bundle about three feet long and 7 or 8 inches thick, while the rubber made a bundle about 18 or 20 inches long and about 8 inches thick. In all, he estimated, the entire lot would have weighed maybe five pounds.
There was no sign of any metal in the area which might have been used for an engine and no sign of any propellers of any kind, although at least one paper fin had been glued onto some of the tinfoil.

There were no words to be found anywhere on the instrument, although there were letters on some of the parts. Considerable scotch tape and some tape with flowers printed upon it had been used in the construction.

No strings or wire were to be found but there were some eyelets in the paper to indicate that some sort of attachment may have been used.

(UNQUOTE)

DENVER – UNDATED: Major Jesse Marcel from the Roswell Army Air Field with debris found 75 miles north west of Roswell, NM, in June 1947. The debris has been identified as that of a radar target. The Air Force released a report on 24 June debunking reports of a UFO crash near Roswell, NM, in 1947. (Photo by: UNITED STATES AIR FORCE/AFP/Getty Images)

(ABOVE PHOTO – – quote from Jesse Marcel: “The stuff in that photo was pieces of the actual stuff we found. It was not a staged photo“)

THAT WAS PRACTICALLY THE END OF THE STORY.

UNTIL:

More than 30 years after the incident, a few die-hard believers in the ‘alien saucer myth’ started questioning again the explanation that it was a “weather balloon”.

(And they were right, it was not just a “weather balloon”.  It was a top-secret program called Project Mogul, which was finally and officially revealed in 1994).

A book entitled THE ROSWELL INCIDENT came out in 1980, co-authored by Charles Berlitz and William L. Moore (who later on identified himself as a disinformation agent).  It became a best-seller.

In order to write this book, the authors claimed they interviewed some of the so-called “witnesses” to this incident.  They also delegated a few researchers to search for any other “witnesses” in the Roswell area.  Also, independent from them were a few other researchers (such as Stanton Friedman) who, on their own, attempted to look for witnesses.

The big problem was that they interviewed folks more than 30 years after the incident took place.  And many of the so-called “witnesses” were nothing more than second-hand and third-hand “witnesses”.  Many of them were willing to be interviewed for the chance to be in the “spotlight”, so to speak.  There were also some late-comer “witnesses” to this circus, such as Glenn Dennis who, in 1989, began to claim that he was working as a mortician the day the “saucer” wreckage arrived and that he knew a nurse who supposedly assisted at the “alien” autopsies, but her name has never appeared on any records.  (Glenn Dennis became the founder of the UFO Museum at Roswell)

The total accuracy of the so-called “witnesses” (more than 30 years after the incident) was highly questionable, particularly Jesse Marcel who was a believer from the get-go and whose unfounded beliefs had been properly over-ridden and dismissed by his superiors.

Despite Marcel’s  frequently changing his testimony about the Roswell debris throughout the Roswell fiasco, in August, 1948, he was transferred to the Strategic Air Command, where he was eventually put in charge of a Pentagon briefing room for the Air Force of Atomic Energy (AFOT-1).

In July, 1950 he returned to Houma, Louisiana and opened a small-town TV repair shop.

When he was released from active duty, his commission (as a Lieutenant Colonel) was transferred to the Air Force Reserves.

He eventually received his full discharge in 1958.

(In 1978 Stanton Friedman found Jesse Marcel in Houma, Louisiana where he had retired and was still running the radio-TV repair shop)

PROJECT MOGUL:

Project Mogul was a super-secret operation in 1947 that involved the use of constant-level balloon trains that were equipped with various instruments for intelligence gathering purposes. Constant level balloon trains are clusters of balloons that are balanced so that they can float at a fairly consistent altitude and not continually rise up into the atmosphere.
Project Mogul was a classified operation begun by the U.S. government after the end of World War II to spy on the former Soviet Union in order to determine the status of Russian attempts to build nuclear weapons.
Project Mogul was so secret and sensitive that it had a national security rating of “Top Secret A-1,” equal to that of the original Manhattan Project (the effort to build the world’s first atomic bomb).  – – (courtesy of Kal Korff, former systems analyst, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)

(Other reconnaissance balloon projects from the era included Project Skyhook, Project Grandson, Project Genetrix and Projct Moby Dick, pictured above)

It was the town of Roswell that eventually benefited from the 1947 “Alien saucer crash” myth.
(And those who continued to propagate the ‘alien saucer crash’ story, i.e., the so-called UFO INDUSTRY)

ROSWELL HEROES OR MYTHMAKERS?
Jesse Marcel, Walter Haut, Frank Kaufmann and Glenn Dennis.
Walter Haut vouched for these two men, who were later determined to be telling tall tales and lies about their involvement.
Was it all about promoting the UFO Museum?.
PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING EXCELLENT ITEM BY TIM PRINTY:

See the following presentation by Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.
LAYING TO REST, ONCE AND FOR ALL, THE ROSWELL ‘ALIEN SAUCER CRASH’ STORY:

– – – –

P.S.

from WIKIPEDIA:

A problem with all the (alleged “witnesses”) accounts, charge critics, is they all came about a minimum of 31 years after the events in question, and in many cases were recounted more than 40 years after the fact.

Not only are memories this old of dubious reliability, they were also subject to contamination from other accounts the interviewees may have been exposed to.

The shifting claims of Jesse Marcel, whose suspicion that what he recovered in 1947 was “not of this world” sparked interest in the incident in the first place, cast serious doubt on the reliability of what he claimed to be true.

In (the book) THE ROSWELL INCIDENT (1980 – Charles Berlitz and William Moore), Marcel stated, “Actually, this material may have looked like tinfoil and balsa wood, but the resemblance ended there […] They took one picture of me on the floor holding up some of the less-interesting metallic debris […] The stuff in that one photo was pieces of the actual stuff we found. It was not a staged photo.”:

DENVER – UNDATED: Major Jesse Marcel from the Roswell Army Air Field with debris found 75 miles north west of Roswell, NM, in June 1947. The debris has been identified as that of a radar target. The Air Force released a report on 24 June debunking reports of a UFO crash near Roswell, NM, in 1947. (Photo by: UNITED STATES AIR FORCE/AFP/Getty Images)

Timothy Printy (1999 “Roswell 4F; Fabrication, Fumbled Facts and Fables“, Chapt. 6) points out that the material Marcel positively identified as being part of what he recovered is material that skeptics and UFO advocates agree is debris from a balloon device.
After that fact was pointed out to him, Marcel changed his story to say that that material was not what he recovered.

Skeptics like Robert Todd (“Jesse Marcel: Folk Hero or Mythomaniac”, December, 1995) argued that Marcel had a history of embellishment and exaggeration, such as claiming to have been a pilot and having received five Air Medals for shooting down enemy planes, claims that were all found to be false, and skeptics feel that his evolving Roswell story was simply another instance of this tendency to fabricate.

(END QUOTE)

 

Also, often erroneously associated with this topic, please read:

AREA 51 IN NEVADA AND DULCE, NEW MEXICO – – REALITY VERSUS MYTHS

– – –

Norio Hayakawa’s CIVILIAN INTELLIGENCE NEWS SERVICE

E-mail = noriohayakawa@gmail.com

FACEBOOK = https://www.facebook.com/fernandon.hayakawa

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2 thoughts on “1947 – – birth of the Roswell “alien saucer crash” myth that eventually helped promote the UFO Industry

  1. The “UFO Believers” will be even more angry with you Norio.

    Advanced alien spacecraft, perhaps a million years ahead of us on the evolutionary scale, are being brought down by lightning or are crashing into each other. Now there are many other “Roswell’s around the globe. Last count around 20!

    Didn’t you get the memo? LOL

    Like

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