William Cooper’s collapsed views on UFOs, following his publication of “Behold a Pale Horse”

quotes from

How William Cooper’s book “Behold a Pale Horse” planted seeds of QAnon conspiracy

(written by Richard Ruelas and Rob O’Dell – – October 1, 2020)

(QUOTE:

Milton William Cooper joined the military after high school and served in Vietnam as a Naval patrol boat captain.

In 1972, he was part of the team that briefed the commander of the Navy’s Pacific fleet.  It was then that Cooper claimed to have read a trove of secret documents.

Years later, Cooper would use hypnosis to recall the documents in greater detail, he wrote in his book.  They showed, according to Cooper, that the government had not only made contact with alien life, but also struck a deal to work with them to turn some portion of earthlings into slave labor.  For that plan to work, Cooper said, the public would have to accept a global government.

After he returned to the United States, Cooper, in his book, said he attempted to tell what he knew to a reporter.  Around that time, he was riding his motorcycle near Oakland, California, when, in his telling, he collided with a black limousine.  As a result, doctors amputated his right leg above the knee.

Cooper wrote in “Behold a Pale Horse” that two men visited him in the hospital and asked if he had learned his lesson.  Cooper told them he would be “a good little boy” but silently vowed to himself that he would release his information.

By 1984, Cooper was living in Fullerton, California, working at a small private technical college and was again ready to share what he knew.

……………..

Cooper started giving lectures on what was then a thriving UFO circuit, said Norio Hayakawa, who helped set up Cooper’s first speaking gigs in the Los Angeles area.

“He brought this whole fresh new viewpoint on UFOs,” Hayakawa said in a phone interview from his New Mexico home.  “He connected the UFO phenomenon to the secret government and a plan to create a New World Order.”

Cooper’s lectures were dark, Hayakawa said, compared with the relatively lighter fare of abductions and sightings the UFO community was used to.

By the late 1980s, Cooper had moved to Camp Verde, Arizona, and was traveling the country giving lectures.  Wherever he appeared, he set up a merchandise table to sell his writings and recordings of his lectures.

…………….

Behold a Pale Horse” was published in 1991.

In the opening pages, Cooper wrote, “The ideas and conclusions expressed in this work are mine alone.  It is possible that one or more conclusions may be wrong.”   His aim, he wrote, was to provide information so readers begin their own “earnest search for the truth.”

Details of what Cooper claimed to have read in the classified documents, including the secret alien outreach that Cooper asserted started with the Eisenhower administration, were sprinkled throughout the book.

……………

The book first found an audience among UFO aficionados.

……………

Around the time he published his own book, Cooper became convinced his UFO theories were wrong.  He told his radio listeners he had been duped when he was in the Navy.  The documents he had seen were fake, he said, designed to further the myth of aliens and keep the population afraid.

But, Cooper asserted, his theories about shadowy forces bent on world domination were still valid.

The transition came as UFO culture faded in popularity, said Hayakawa, who continued as a UFO researcher.

It also came as the militia movement rose.

Cooper’s theories about a looming oppressive government resonated with that crowd.

Hayakawa said he lost touch with Cooper after he moved to Arizona and renounced his beliefs in aliens.  “He became angrier and angrier as the years went by,” Hayakawa said.  “I didn’t want to talk to him because he gets mad.”

…………..

When he moved to Eagar, Arizona, he lived in a house on a hill.  During the day, he broadcast oldies on a low-power FM station.  Most evenings, he moved to shortwave radio and broadcast his “Hour of the Time” show.

…………..

Cooper’s show opened with the sound of an air raid siren.  That was followed, at least in the mid-’90s, by the sounds of barking dogs, marching soldiers and people screaming in anguish.

Once the show started, Cooper came across calm and authoritative.  He was a natural behind the microphone, said his biographer Jacobson, who listened to hours of archived shows.  “Bill Cooper found his medium in radio,” Jacobson said.

……………

P.S.

After his death (November 6, 2001)  and after his funeral (November 15, 2001) :

Cooper’s funeral was sparsely attended, said Hayakawa, who traveled to Eagar for the service.  He recalled a contingent of federal agents out front.

FBI records show that agents worried the memorial service would attract militia members from around the country.  But that didn’t materialize.

(UNQUOTE)

…………..

Norio Hayakawa’s CIVILIAN INTELLIGENCE NEWS SERVICE

E-mail = noriohayakawa@gmail.com

Facebook = http://www.facebook.com/fernandon.hayakawa

Please also watch Norio Hayakawa’s YouTube Channel

Unfounded “facts” give births to dangerous conspiracy theories and modern myths

by Norio Hayakawa – – October 5, 2020:

Everybody knows that conspiracies have always existed since time immemorial.

It is a salient part of the darker side of human history.

Everybody also knows that whenever two or more gather together to plot something that will cause detriment to others, there is conspiracy.

Here, I would like to talk about the culture of conspiracy.   

There is a difference between real conspiracies and conspiracy theories.   

Conspiracy theories have also existed throughout human history.  It has also been a part of the human culture, since “suspicion” is one of the many aspects of the human mind itself.   Some folks are less “suspicious” of others.   Some are more “suspicious” of others.

Now let’s turn our eyes on America.

Unfortunately, the growth of America’s conspiracy culture seems to be quite significant.

It is an alarming trend, fomented by many through the use of the social media.

Unsubstantiated “facts” often give births to dangerous conspiracy theories and modern myths.

But the sad fact is that such beliefs seem to be accepted by an increasingly gullible sector of the population, regardless of the level of education.

Moreover, it could easily be manipulated by some exploitative folks with certain agendas  (including some politicians)  and can even cause the nation to be divided, fomenting fear and paranoia.

We must never forget that the birth of Nazi Germany started by such propagation of fear and paranoia and pointing the blame to a certain group of people.

 

Here is a quote from Edward Epstein, WSJ – – December, 2015):

Conspiracy is a word derived from the Latin “to breathe together”.

It has been a salient part of the darker side of recorded history ever since some 60 conspirators in the Roman senate, including Brutus and Cassius, plotted together to assassinate Julius Caesar in 44 B.C.  

Nowadays the “C” word does not always sit well with journalists, who commonly employ it in conjunction with “theory” to describe paranoid distortions of reality.

Even so, a criminal conspiracy is not a rare phenomenon.  

Not only was a foreign conspiracy responsible for the monstrous 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center  (as well as the previous attempt to blow it up in 1993)  but, according to the Center on Law and Security at Fordham University, over 90% of routine federal indictments for terrorist attacks since 9/11 contain at least one conspiracy charge.

The government’s pursuit of conspiracies is by no means limited to terrorism.

Conspiracy charges are the rule rather than the exception in cases brought against businessmen accused of fixing prices, evading environmental regulations, using insider information or laundering money.

 

But there are also pseudo-conspiracies that exist only in a delusionary or misinformed mind.…..such as well-orchestrated global conspiracies, simply because no major secrets can be kept forever from the public.

Conspiracies are easily disproved by a wealth of evidence and some basic, sound reasoning, and yet sizable portions of the population continue to believe in absurd ideas such as the following:

 

  • The moon landings are claimed to be hoaxes manufactured by large-scale government collusion.
  • Aliens in UFOs are claimed to have visited earth but their presence is concealed by malevolent agencies.

 (I personally don’t think there is an intentional, governmental cover-up of the UFO phenomenon.  My belief is that the government is just as perplexed by this phenomenon as the pubic, as to the true nature of this phenomenon.  As I stated many times elsewhere, I personally believe in the reality of the UFO phenomenon.  However, I also believe that the UFO phenomenon does  not constitute conclusive evidence whatsoever that we have ever been – or are being – visited by physical extraterrestrial biological entities in physical extraterrestrial spacecraft of any kind.  For a good item on this, please go to the bottom of this article and read about the Roswell Incident – – the creation of a modern myth, how it all started)

 

  • Modern medicine is claimed to be toxic and “alternative” medicine is claimed to be miraculous, but a global conspiracy involving greedy drug companies conceals these facts.
  • Trails of ice particles left by airplanes in the sky (“contrails“) are claimed to really be toxic chemicals (“chemtrails“) being sprayed on the whole earth by a secret group intent on destruction and domination.
  • The AIDS virus was allegedly constructed in a laboratory and is deliberately used by a secret society as a tool of destruction.
  • Fluoride is claimed to be added to drinking water by secret government programs in order to exert mind control.
  • A New World Order of elites is claimed to be secretly controlling all governments for malevolent purposes.

(This one, I do personally believe, will take place in the far future.  As a born-again Christian and a Bible-believing person, I do believe in Bible prophecy concerning the End times and that there will be a one world government or a New World Order ruled by an Anti-Christ for 7 years, just before Jesus Christ returns to set up His Millennial Kingdom – – this is strictly my own personal religious belief and nothing more.   My personal religious belief is that eons ago, one third of all cosmic, sentient, paraphysical angelic entities were thrown out of their special domain by the Creator for participating in a cosmic shaking revolt led by Lucifer who became Satan, and his followers “fallen angels” – – as suggested in Revelation 12:4 – – many biblical scholars seem to support this interpretation.   Thus, my belief is that Lucifer was the first conspirator ever.)

  • The Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and other terrorist attacks are claimed to be carried out secretly by the people’s own government in an effort to foment war.
  • Free energy devices are claimed to successfully create energy out of nothing, but their widespread use is suppressed by powerful conspiracies involving energy companies.
  • Genetically modified crops are claimed to be dangerous and a vast conspiracy is claimed to be suppressing evidence showing this fact.                                
  •  
  • Despite the fact that conspiracies such as these run completely contrary to a giant body of evidence, and indeed go against logical reasoning itself, such conspiracies continue to be believed by many people.

Here is latest one:

The QAnon Conspiracy theory, which the FBI has called a domestic terrorism threat, is based on unfounded claims that there is a “deep-state” apparatus run by political elites, business leaders and Hollywood celebrities who are also pedophiles and actually working against Donald Trump.  Trump, they say, is waging a secret war against the deep-state, globalist, elite Satan-worshipping pedophiles in government, business and the media.

QAnon believers have speculated that this fight will lead to a day of reckoning where prominent people such as former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton will be arrested and executed.

That’s the basic story, but there are so many offshoots, detours and internal debates that the total list of QAnon claims is enormous – and often contradictory.  Adherents draw in news events, historical facts and numerology to develop their own far-fetched conclusions.

It has accused many liberal Hollywood actors, Democratic politicians, and high-ranking officials of being members of the cabal.  It also claimed that Trump feigned conspiracy with Russians to enlist Robert Mueller to join him in exposing the ring and preventing a coup d’état by Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and George Soros.

The list goes on and on.

Take a look at this interesting “chart” that someone posted on the Internet:

(CLICK ABOVE FOR ENLARGEMENT)

 

And from Dr. Christopher S. Baird, SCIENCE QUESTIONS WITH SURPRISING ANSWERS – – August, 2013:

 

(QUOTE):

People are all different, so the reasons for them believing in conspiracies cover a broad range of factors.

In general, though, people tend to believe in conspiracies because of helplessness.

Ted Goertzel, professor of sociology at Rutgers University, found that belief in conspiracy theories is strongly linked to insecurity about employment, alienation, lack of interpersonal trust, and minority status – all forms of helplessness.

Despite the fact that conspiracies such as these run completely contrary to a giant body of evidence, and indeed go against logical reasoning itself, such conspiracies continue to be believed by many people.

Why?

The main reason people believe in conspiracies despite their absurdity is helplessness.

Unemployment, under-employment, lack of education, substance addiction, chronic illness, dysfunctional families, and failing relationships all contribute to a person feeling helpless.

In order to cope emotionally with such situations, many people blame their helplessness on conspiracies; giant secret societies with amazing power that control everyone for sinister purposes.

The belief in conspiracies gives those in hopeless and destitute conditions something to hope for.

“If the conspiracy can just be exposed”, they think, “I will no longer be destitute”.

The belief itself becomes empowering to many in helpless situations.

They see the rest of the world as mindless sheep controlled by the elite, and themselves as the enlightened few.

The belief in conspiracies also enables such people to emotionally cope with the chaos that surrounds their life by believing there is an overall ordered society of elites that controls the world.

Even though they see this society as secretive and evil, the belief itself in an ordered, controlling society is enough to offer comfort to one who feels surrounded by chaos and helpless to their situation.

Although a person may be safely employed in a rewarding career, a lack of education can be enough to render him subconsciously helpless and therefore susceptible to conspiracy theories.

When a person does not understand the basic physical laws that govern the universe, daily events seem random and nonsensical.

Being confronted day in and day out with a jumble of incomprehensible events is harrowing.

To deal with this mental commotion, many people see conspiracies as the driving forces behind the seemingly random string of events.

In reality, the laws of science run the world.

But it is much easier to believe a secret society runs the world than to try to understand the laws of science if you have a poor education.

Helplessness can take many other forms.

Even wealthy, educated people get cancer.

The miserable, ongoing, and terminal nature of serious diseases can make even the richest and smartest of people feel helpless.

When modern medicine fails to help them (or just takes too long to help them), many people turn to conspiracies to cope.  It’s more comforting to believe that a miracle cure is available but is kept just out of reach by a conspiring pharmaceutical industry, than to accept the reality that some diseases simply do not have cures.

It’s more comforting to believe that your cancer was caused by chemtrails, water fluoridation, genetically modified crops, aliens, western medicine, tooth amalgam, household cleaning supplies, or power lines than to accept that cancer is a natural part of life that just happens.

Goertzel states, “…during periods of insecurity and discontent people often feel a need for a tangible enemy on which to externalize their angry feelings.

Conspiracy theories may help in this process by providing a tangible enemy to blame for problems which otherwise seem too abstract and impersonal.

Conspiracy theories also provide ready answers for unanswered questions and help to resolve contradictions between known ‘facts’ and an individual’s belief system.”

Note that some conspiracies are real.

But the real conspiracies are quickly dismantled by the justice system and are well documented by mainstream scientists, journalists, and historians.

Also, real conspiracies tend to involve only a handful of people and are rarely successful.

Most real conspiracies fall apart before they even get started, while the rest are eventually exposed and dismantled.

Giant, powerful, successful conspiracies do not happen for the following reasons:

It only takes one whistle-blower to bring down an entire conspiracy.

The more people there are in a conspiracy, the more potential whistle-blowers there are, and the shorter the conspiracy lasts.

The most successful conspiracies (such as Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme) involve only a handful of people, and they still eventually fail.

Sustaining a global conspiracy among medical doctors would require convincing every single one of the millions of doctors from all religions, nations, and cultures to participate in a coordinated cover-up.

People are inherently independent minded.

Sustaining a global conspiracy would require making millions of people from all walks of life have the exact same goals and motives, and be willing to do what ever they are told to perpetuate the conspiracy.

In the business world, people quit their job, move, start their own business, and campaign for reform whenever faced with too little independence.

These types of actions would doom a conspiracy.

History teaches us that the level of authoritarianism needed to sustain a global conspiracy leads to violent revolution by the masses.

A large conspiracy would be doomed by internal warfare before it ever got off the ground.

People are inherently decent.

The vast majority of people on the earth are ethical, law-abiding citizens that pursue careers and causes in order to benefit society.

A giant conspiracy would require a large number of people to lie, cheat, and purposely harm their family, friends, neighbors, and country.

We are all human.

Doctors get sick too.

Doctors therefore have a strong personal incentive not to suppress medical treatments that succeed.

Government employees live under the same sky and drink the same water.

They have a strong personal incentive not to poison the water or fill the sky with chemicals.

Large organizations are inherently too inefficient, cumbersome, and complex to carry out a large, coordinated plan of evil secrecy.

Even the most successful large-scale secretive agency in the world – the CIA – has security leaks (such as the Snowden affair).

The difference between the CIA and a conspiracy is that the CIA’s mission is supported by the will of the people and is seen as generally beneficial, so it survives its security leaks.  A large-scale conspiracy would not.

Note that this website, Science Questions with Surprising Answers, does not attempt to disprove conspiracies.

I believe such an exercise is pointless and futile.

Presenting conspiracy theorists with logic and evidence won’t change their minds as such people are not thinking logically to begin with.

Because helplessness is the root of belief in conspiracies, the best way to dispel their paranoia is to help them get out of their destitute situation.

Improving the general educational level, career prospects, community involvement, and family relationships of conspiracy theorists will do more to dispel their myths than arguing directly against their myths.

Something as simple as participating in a town hall meeting can help a neighbor realize that the world is not as evil and colluding as he imagines.

(UNQUOTE)

 

By the way, for those of you who are into UFOs, here is a good example of how UFO conspiracy theories start, i.e., through the propagation of unsubstantiated “facts”, as exemplified in the ROSWELL CONSPIRACY….click the following and read about:

THE ROSWELL INCIDENT OF 1947 – – CREATION OF A MODERN MYTH

However, what I describe as paraphysical phenomenon does seem to exist and has nothing to do with conspiracies:

PARAPHYSICAL PHENOMENON SEEMS TO EXIST IN DULCE, NEW MEXICO

……..

Norio Hayakawa’s CIVILIAN INTELLIGENCE NEWS SERVICE

E-mail = noriohayakawa@gmail.com

Facebook = http://www.facebook.com/fernandon.hayakawa

Norio Hayakawa’s YouTube Channel

How William Cooper’s book “Behold a Pale Horse” planted seeds of QAnon conspiracy

by Richard Ruelas and Rob O’Dell – – October 1, 2020, ARIZONA CENTRAL/ARIZONA REPUBLIC

https://www.azcentral.com/in-depth/news/local/arizona-investigations/2020/10/01/behold-pale-horse-how-william-cooper-planted-seeds-qanon-theory/3488115001/

(QUOTE)

EAGAR, Ariz. — When authorities killed William Cooper in a burst of gunfire outside his hilltop home in eastern Arizona, he was an author and radio host who had attracted a rabid following among UFO buffs, prisoners and the militia movement.

For them, his book, “Behold a Pale Horse,” and nightly shortwave radio show lifted the veil on how the world actually works.

Through his death in 2001, Cooper’s legacy was cemented.  He was seen as a sage and legend.  His book would become a defining text for conspiracy-minded people.  What might have otherwise been seen as an amateurish hodgepodge of ideas earned gravitas once its author was gunned down.

Though the official story had Cooper killed as deputies tried to arrest him on a local criminal charge, devotees would make him a martyr.  Global forces, it was thought, needed him silenced.

Nearly 30 years after its publication, “Behold a Pale Horse” remains a bestseller, finding new audiences for whom Cooper’s warnings – – of a cashless society, a socialist order that devalues work, the confiscation of weapons, global leadership usurping the sovereignty of the United States – – still resonate.

Though portions of the book are dated, some paragraphs can strike readers as eerily prescient.

Cooper described a CIA plan to induce in people, via drugs and hypnosis, the desire to shoot up schoolyards.  Cooper said such incidents would hasten the call for gun control.  “This plan is well under way,” he wrote.  “The middle class is begging the government to do away with the 2nd Amendment.”

Cooper’s work describes a conspiracy that is timeless:  Nearly all that has been told to you is illusion.  If you think shadowy forces are pulling the strings, it is because they are.  Don’t trust anybody and be on guard.  Citizens must soon fight for what they hold dear.

Cooper saw his mission as increasingly urgent.

“Unless we can wake the people from their sleep nothing short of civil war will stop the planned outcome,” Cooper wrote in the book’s opening pages.

That Cooper would die in a shootout with authorities seemed fated.  And, in his book, he suggested it was an honorable way to die.

“I believe that any man without principles that he is ready and willing to die for at any given moment is already dead and is of no use or consequence whatsoever,” Cooper wrote in the creed that began his book.

The internet was not yet ubiquitous in the mid-1980s when Cooper started spilling what he said was clandestine information from top secret documents he read as a member of a naval intelligence unit.

Cooper used not only his book, but also in-person lectures, mail-order cassette tapes and a show on shortwave radio to share his understanding of a master plan to destroy the world.

Even though many have never heard of Cooper, his dark, conspiratorial thinking has endured and been amplified.  He was a forerunner to the conspiracy theorists of today such as Alex Jones – – with whom Cooper feuded.

One audience that found “Behold a Pale Horse” is the Patriot wing of the Republican Party.  In an invitation-only Facebook group, some members of Patriot Movement AZ, a group of far-right Republicans, traded their thoughts on conspiracy theories and their hatred of Muslims and immigrants.  Members of the group have also become influential in the Arizona Republican Party.

The ARIZONA REPUBLIC reviewed thousands of the group’s posts, comments, photos and videos shared between 2016 and 2019.

“I’m almost done with ‘behold a pale horse’ which details deep state control using school shootings, etc, as political motives to control the USA.  Also very scary,” a member commented in May 2018.

The book has also attracted followers of the conspiracy theory known as QAnon, which falsely casts Democrats as doing the bidding of globalists in order to shield their perversions, including devouring babies for their nourishing blood.

QAnon adherents believe an anonymous figure inside government is sporadically posting cryptic clues to corruption and the perpetrators of child-sex crimes using various online bulletin boards – – the shortwave radio of modern times.  The anonymous source of the information is “Q,” named for the level of top secret clearance he’s purported to have.

One adherent, Jake Angeli, has intentionally made a spectacle of himself by appearing at Arizona protests wearing a fur hat topped with horns and carrying a weathered sign that reads, “Q sent me.”  Angeli said he has researched the secretive groups he believes control the world – – Illuminati, Trilateral Commission and Bilderberg group, among others – – and felt validated by finding Cooper mentioned them in his book.

(ABOVE – – Jake Angeli, who was recently arrested in the Capitol Insurrection that took place on January 6, 2021)

Angeli said that the government needed to kill Cooper to silence him.

“When you really do enough research, it all ties together,” he said.

Another tie:  In “Behold a Pale Horse,” Cooper claimed to have Q-level security clearance.

 

Milton William Cooper joined the military after high school and served in Vietnam as a Naval patrol boat captain.

In 1972, he was part of the team that briefed the commander of the Navy’s Pacific fleet.  It was then that Cooper claimed to have read a trove of secret documents.

Years later, Cooper would use hypnosis to recall the documents in greater detail, he wrote in his book.  They showed, according to Cooper, that the government had not only made contact with alien life, but also struck a deal to work with them to turn some portion of earthlings into slave labor.  For that plan to work, Cooper said, the public would have to accept a global government.

After he returned to the United States, Cooper, in his book, said he attempted to tell what he knew to a reporter.  Around that time, he was riding his motorcycle near Oakland, California, when, in his telling, he collided with a black limousine.  As a result, doctors amputated his right leg above the knee.

Cooper wrote in “Behold a Pale Horse” that two men visited him in the hospital and asked if he had learned his lesson.  Cooper told them he would be “a good little boy” but silently vowed to himself that he would release his information.

By 1984, Cooper was living in Fullerton, California, working at a small private technical college and was again ready to share what he knew.

……………..

Cooper started giving lectures on what was then a thriving UFO circuit, said Norio Hayakawa, who helped set up Cooper’s first speaking gigs in the Los Angeles area.

“He brought this whole fresh new viewpoint on UFOs,” Hayakawa said in a phone interview from his New Mexico home.  “He connected the UFO phenomenon to the secret government and a plan to create a New World Order.”

Cooper’s lectures were dark, Hayakawa said, compared with the relatively lighter fare of abductions and sightings the UFO community was used to.

By the late 1980s, Cooper had moved to Camp Verde, Arizona, and was traveling the country giving lectures.  Wherever he appeared, he set up a merchandise table to sell his writings and recordings of his lectures.

…………….

Behold a Pale Horse” was published in 1991.

In the opening pages, Cooper wrote, “The ideas and conclusions expressed in this work are mine alone.  It is possible that one or more conclusions may be wrong.”   His aim, he wrote, was to provide information so readers begin their own “earnest search for the truth.”

Details of what Cooper claimed to have read in the classified documents, including the secret alien outreach that Cooper asserted started with the Eisenhower administration, were sprinkled throughout the book.

……………

The book first found an audience among UFO aficionados.

……………

Around the time he published his own book, Cooper became convinced his UFO theories were wrong.  He told his radio listeners he had been duped when he was in the Navy.  The documents he had seen were fake, he said, designed to further the myth of aliens and keep the population afraid.

But, Cooper asserted, his theories about shadowy forces bent on world domination were still valid.

The transition came as UFO culture faded in popularity, said Hayakawa, who continued as a UFO researcher.

It also came as the militia movement rose.

Cooper’s theories about a looming oppressive government resonated with that crowd.

Hayakawa said he lost touch with Cooper after he moved to Arizona and renounced his beliefs in aliens.  “He became angrier and angrier as the years went by,” Hayakawa said.  “I didn’t want to talk to him because he gets mad.”

…………..

When he moved to Eagar, Arizona, he lived in a house on a hill.  During the day, he broadcast oldies on a low-power FM station.  Most evenings, he moved to shortwave radio and broadcast his “Hour of the Time” show.

…………..

Cooper’s show opened with the sound of an air raid siren.  That was followed, at least in the mid-’90s, by the sounds of barking dogs, marching soldiers and people screaming in anguish.

Once the show started, Cooper came across calm and authoritative.  He was a natural behind the microphone, said his biographer Jacobson, who listened to hours of archived shows.  “Bill Cooper found his medium in radio,” Jacobson said.

…………….

Among fans of Cooper’s shortwave show was a man from Kingman named Timothy McVeigh.  According to the FBI, McVeigh owned a videotape about the botched federal raid of the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas, called, “Waco, The Big Lie,” that Cooper had promoted.  An agent noted that McVeigh’s copy had a Show Low, Arizona, address on it, indicating McVeigh ordered it from Cooper.

McVeigh received the death penalty for the April 1995 bombing of a federal building in Oklahoma City that killed 168 people.

……………

In June 1998, Cooper and his wife were indicted on three counts of attempted tax evasion.

………….

FBI documents show agents monitored Cooper, including with surveillance cameras. But agents decided to not engage with him, fearing a violent clash, the documents show.

…………..

One friend, whose name was redacted from an FBI report, told an agent he feared that Cooper felt inadequate and sought “to become a martyr so that if he is killed he will end up being somebody important.”

………….

In November 2001, the plan was set.

Deputies would attempt a ruse to draw out Cooper.  Around midnight, deputies in plainclothes drove up the hill, parked and blasted loud music, acting as if they were partying teens.  Cooper came out to chase them away, but never got out of his vehicle as deputies had expected.

The attempted arrest went south.

Deputies converged on Cooper as he tried to drive back to his house.  A tactical van that was supposed to block the street never got into position, according to a police report, and Cooper drove around it.

Cooper parked his truck in his driveway as deputies gave chase on foot.  Cooper got out of his truck and had nearly made it to his front door when he turned and started firing.  One shot struck a deputy, Robert Marinez, in the head, leaving him gravely wounded.

Another deputy, Joseph Goldsmith, returned fire, shooting at Cooper nine times, emptying his gun.  Cooper took fatal hits to his heart and head.

……………

Cooper’s funeral was sparsely attended, said Hayakawa, who traveled to Eagar for the service.  He recalled a contingent of federal agents out front.

FBI records show that agents worried the memorial service would attract militia members from around the country.  But that didn’t materialize.

(UNQUOTE)

CLICK AND WATCH ON YOUTUBE:

HOW WILLIAM COOPER’S BOOK “BEHOLD A PALE HORSE” PLANTED SEEDS OF QANON CONSPIRACY, PART 1

and

HOW WILLIAM COOPER’S BOOK “BEHOLD A PALE HORSE” PLANTED SEEDS OF QANON CONSPIRACY, PART 2

……….

Norio Hayakawa’s CIVILIAN INTELLIGENCE NEWS SERVICE

E-mail = noriohayakawa@gmail.com

Facebook = http://www.facebook.com/fernandon.hayakawa

Please also watch Norio Hayakawa’s YouTube Channel