The difference between the Buddhist swastika symbol and the Nazi swastika symbol

omoteura

In Japanese Buddhism, the Manji is an ancient and important spiritual symbol.

The Manji (Sanscrit:  Svastika) represents the harmonious interplay of the many opposites in life – – heaven and earth, day and night, etc.

The horizontal line unites light and darkness, while the perpendicular line symbolically connects heaven and earth;  and these two combined, form a cross representing the universe in harmony beyond the limits of time and space.

From this harmony comes the power that creates and nurtures all things.

The ‘trailing’ lines at the ends of the cross represent the truth that the universe and all things in it are in a perpetual state of flux.

There two types of Manji — one a mirror image of the other.

The ‘counterclock’ Manji — with the ‘trailing lines’ running from the ends of the central cross to the left (called “Omote“) — represents infinite mercy.   This is the prevalent Buddhist Manji symbol in Japan:

manji_omote

Buddhist-swastika-150x150

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swastika

 

The ‘clockwise’ Manji — with the ‘trailing lines’ running from the ends of the central cross to the right (called “Ura“) — represents intellect and strength.

 

manji_ura

The evil Nazis, twisting the true meaning of the “Ura Manji”, adopted it and tilted the Manji symbol at an angle of 45 degrees (corners pointing upwards and invariably in black).  Here is the much-hated Nazi swastika:

Nazi-sawastika-150x150

The Nazis ruined that symbol forever.

THE MANJI SYMBOL INFORMATION, FROM JAMES DEACON

The by way, the universal svastika symbol also arose independently in southwestern Native American cultures as the Whirling Log. It was also used especially by the Native Americans of the Mississippian culture:

svastika-in-native-american-culture

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Norio Hayakawa’s CIVILIAN INTELLIGENCE NEWS SERVICE

E-mail = noriohayakawa@gmail.com

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